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Interfacility Transport of the Burn-Injured Patient Part 1

Upon conclusion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Recite criteria outlined by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma and the American Burn Association (ABA) that dictate the types of burn injuries that should be referred to a verified burn center;
  • Explain the community need for specialized resources and systems to safely transfer patients with critical burn injuries to the proper level of care;
  • Develop a protocol to address transport of critical burn patients from a local hospital to a regional burn center;
  • Detail the list of necessary and recommended supplies for ground and air transfer of the critical burn-injured patient.

1. American Hospital Association. Fast Facts on U.S. Hospitals 2020, www.aha.org/statistics/fast-facts-us-hospitals. 

2. American Burn Association. Burn Center Regional Map, http://ameriburn.org/public-resources/burn-center-regional-map/. 

3. Klein MB, Kramer CB, Nelson J, et al. Geographic access to burn center hospitals. JAMA, 2009; 302(16): 1,774–81. 

4. Hick JL. Right care, right place, right time. Regional systems of care are the best way to ensure patients with emergent conditions have the best outcomes. Minnesota Medicine, 2015; 98(5): 32–3. 

5. Klein MB, Nathens AB, Emerson D, et al. An analysis of the long-distance transport of burn patients to a regional burn center. J Burn Care Res, 2007; 28(1): 49–55. 

6. Ahmed A, Van Heukelom P, Harland K, et al. Characterizing demographics, injury severity, and intubation status for patients transported by air or ground ambulance to a rural burn center. J Burn Care Res, 2014; 35(3): e151–8. 

7. Vercruysse GA, Friese RS, Khalil M, et al. Overuse of helicopter transport in the minimally injured: A health care system problem that should be corrected. J Trauma Acute Care Surg, 2015; 78(3): 510–5. 

8. Roman J, Shank W, Demirjian J, et al. Overutilization of Helicopter Transport in Smaller Burns—A Healthcare System Problem That Should Be Corrected. J Burn Care Res, 2020 Jan 30; 41(1): 15–22. 

9. Sun CF, Lv XX, Li YJ, et al. Epidemiological studies of electrical injuries in Shaanxi province of China: a retrospective report of 383 cases. Burns, 2012 Jun; 38(4): 568–72. 

10. Griggs C, Goverman J, Bittner EA, Levi B. Sedation and Pain Management in Burn Patients. Clinics Plastic Surg, 2017; 44(3): 535–40. 

11. Buckland DM, Crowe RP, Cash RE, et al. Ketamine in the Prehospital Environment: A National Survey of Paramedics in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med, 2018; 33(1): 23–8. 

12. Zorumski CF, Izumi Y, Mennerick S. Ketamine: NMDA Receptors and Beyond. J Neurosci, 2016; 36(44): 11,158–64. 

13. Edrich T, Friedrich AD, Eltzschig HK, Felbinger TW. Ketamine for long-term sedation and analgesia of a burn patient. Anesth Analg, 2004; 99(3): 893–5, table of contents. 

14. Epocrates, www.epocrates.com/mobile/iphone/essentials. 

15. Weaver MD, Rittenberger JC, Patterson PD, et al. Risk factors for hypothermia in EMS-treated burn patients. Prehosp Emerg Care, 2014; 18(3): 335–41. 

16. Du Pont B, Dickinson E. Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia. J Emerg Med Serv, 2017; 42(11). 

  • Format
    Article
  • Duration
    .5
  • Credits
    .5
  • After passing the course, your certificate will be available for download here.